Categories
Rant Web

BT (‘British’ Tele-extortion) Woes

BT have me in a head-lock.

I get my phone and broadband service from them, and am charged, on average, £30 per month.
This is not overly excessive, but I wanted to reduce it somehow, since I’ve been made better offers by Virgin Media.

After digging through the website after looking at my online (paperfree) bill, I eventually find a number. (The usual 0800 800 150).
On calling this number I’m asked by the automated system whether I’m calling from the phone[line] I wish to talk about.
I am, and press ‘1’ to indicate as such. (The alternative is to enter the phone number.)
So why am I asked for that number every bleeding time I actually talk to a real human being?

I’m then asked for my account number for ID verification (though they are loathe to admit that’s why), oh, and my name and my address and postcode. (All of which are on the bill, so anyone who can intercept my bill can claim to be me.)

So, who do I speak with? Various people in India, that well-known British territory.
Is that why they can’t see my phone number, because they’re on some crappy-quality network 5000 miles away?

After explaining the reason for my call I’m told all the things I already know, the total cost of my last bill etc., and I have to suggest that we look into changing my broadband package. Oh no, that means I have to be put through to another department! Okay, fine, just get on with it.
“Welcome to BT. Your call may be recorded…” … “If you’re calling from the phone you wish to talk about…” Argh!

I give all my details again, and am eventually told that I might be better of upgrading my broadband package to avoid a repeat of “your recent email” notifying me that I went over my 8GB limit. That was about 6 months ago.

Can I just cancel my account? “Yes, but you’ll be charged the cancellation fee.”
Not actually a fee, just the whole bill (minus call charges) for the remainder of the contract, which is until August ’08.

Oh bugger.

Categories
Code Tech Tips Web

JavaScript Bug – Modulo of small numbers

It seems that there is a problem with the modulo function, ‘%’, in JavaScript.

For example: 10 % 0.1 should equate to zero but comes out as 0.09999999999999945 probably due to some internal floating-point rounding errors.

Easy solution (a hack really): Multiply both numbers by 1000 before using the modulo function.

Categories
Personal Web

Recursive Moved Itself

The highly observant amongst you may have noticed that I have moved this blog to my personal domain, jezmckean.com.
You should have been brought to this domain automatically, and I hope to fix the multitude of links online, but need the automatic move for those I can’t fix.
I’ve done this because I’m working to separate my freelance business, jazzle.co.uk, from my personal stuff.

Eventually, the blog subdomain at jazzle will be replaced with a work related one.

Categories
Tech Tips Web

IE7 Tip – Reload

IE7 Tip - ReloadWhen IE7 was designed they took the peculiar decision to split the navigation buttons into three places (if you include the home button).

If you find yourself up in the top left wanting to reload, just click the drop-down button and select the current page (will be highlighted and have a tick-mark on the left), as shown in the picture.

Bizarrely and unfortunately, this only works if you’re not looking at the last page in your navigation history for this tab. This suggests that it’s only through poor programming logic that it works at all.

[tags]IE,IE7,Microsoft,tip,tips,browser,flaw,bug[/tags]

Categories
Tech Tips Web

Firefox Tip

I discovered yesterday that [tag]bookmarks[/tag] in [tag]Firefox[/tag] can have no name.

Seems pointless? Not if the sites have [tag]favicons[/tag]:

Firefox Bookmark Favicons

Space saving, so you can see more, hence fewer clicks.

The above are jazzle.co.uk, The Sketchup Components Collection, bit-tech, ebay, amazon, radiotimes.com and the default icon (for a site with no [tag]favicon[/tag]), but you knew that of course since you recognise the sites’ icons.